Sermon Outline On Isaiah 12:2-6

Sermon Outline On Isaiah 12:2-6

Surely God is my salvation;

I will trust and not be afraid.

The Lord, the Lord, is my strength and my song;

he has become my salvation.”

With joy you will draw water

from the wells of salvation.

In that day you will say:

“Give thanks to the Lord, call on his name;

make known among the nations what he has done,

and proclaim that his name is exalted.

Sing to the Lord, for he has done glorious things;

let this be known to all the world.

Shout aloud and sing for joy, people of Zion,

for great is the Holy One of Israel among you.”

We have heard a great deal about the flu and the shortage of flu shots. Did you know that the flu season began with what was considered an ample supply of flu vaccine. There were no early restrictions on who could get a flu shot. Based on the number of people who have received the vaccination, we had plenty.

Then something happened. People started getting the flu in record numbers. All of a sudden there was a shortage of flu vaccine. What happened? People didn’t believe they needed to get a flu shot a couple of months ago, and now it’s too late for many of them.

Will it be said of you and me that we knew people who believed they didn’t need Jesus and the day came that it was too late? The real issue will not be, did we know these people? The real issue will be did we offer Jesus.

‘But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid; for see–I am bringing you good news of great joy for all the people: to you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is the Messiah, the Lord.’ Luke 2:10-11 (NRSV)

Christmas is approaching. It is the birthday of Jesus. The angel said to the shepherds, ‘to you is born THIS DAY.’ It is on this day, Christmas, that Jesus was born. THIS DAY would become a day of celebration, a day to keep, for Christians for centuries. Why is this day so special? Because the one born is THE one of the lineage of David who is a Savior, the Messiah, the Lord. Born a baby who would be a king. Born a human who was also God. Born on THIS DAY a Savior.

The angel said, ‘I am bringing you good news of great joy for all the people.’ The news of a Savior was something to be celebrated with great joy. It was good news that the angel brought. The Savior is here.

Isaiah wrote some 700 years earlier about this same kind of joy.

In that day you will say:

“Give thanks to the Lord, call on his name;

make known among the nations what he has done,

and proclaim that his name is exalted.

Sing to the Lord, for he has done glorious things;

let this be known to all the world.

Shout aloud and sing for joy, people of Zion,

for great is the Holy One of Israel among you.”

Isaiah is writing during difficult times for Israel. There is the threat of the Assyrians and a later threat from the Babylonians. Israel would see dark days. They would be living in difficult times. Many would be held in captivity outside of their home land. They would not be free to worship as they were accustom. They would be a miserable lot. Joy would only be a figment of their imaginations.

So how could Isaiah be saying to the people ‘sing for joy,’ ‘give thanks,’ ‘proclaim that his name is exalted.’ How could he say such things? Over the next 150 years, God’s chosen people would be exiles in foreign lands, they would see the Temple totally destroyed, life would be miserable, and yet Isaiah speaks of joy, strength, trust, glorious things, and giving thanks. How could this be?

Isaiah knew ‘the rest of the story.’ Isaiah knew that God would be their salvation. Isaiah knew that the Israelites could trust God to redeem them from their horrible circumstances. Isaiah while warning his people of the consequences of their behavior also gave them the hope of salvation.

Seven hundred years later, the Israelites would be worshiping in their third Temple. This last one built by King Herod of all people. Seven hundred years later, the chosen people of God would still be longing for a Savior. They would continue to sing the songs given to them by Isaiah:

Surely God is my salvation;

I will trust and not be afraid.

The Lord, the Lord, is my strength and my song;

he has become my salvation.

The shepherds keeping watch over their flocks by night would hear the proclamation of the angel that indeed ‘born to you this day in the city of David a Savior, who is the Messiah, the Lord.’ Joseph and Mary were told to name him Jesus because he would save the people from their sin.

Long before Jesus was born, God’s people could sing ‘Surely God is my salvation.’ They could sing with such joy because they had known they needed a savior. They knew that their final hope was in God who would save them.

O, how we need a savior! Our world is in the midst of moral decay. While the majority of our nation claim to believe in Jesus, they don’t act like it. Although we try our hardest, there are times we don’t act like it.

Life is full of difficult circumstances. We hear all kinds of medical diagnoses that shake us to our bones. Accidents happen and life is never the same. Soldiers in Iraq have their lives saved by body armor only to learn how to use their prosthetic arms and legs. The flu strikes with deadly force. Children starve to death. People prey upon people, physically, mentally, financially. Fire, floods, and storms instantly take all we have accumulated. Drugs and alcohol seize control of our lives. Death parts us from those we love unexpectedly, to quickly and painfully.

WE NEED A SAVIOR. We need to know we need a savior.

A BIT 0F ETERNITY, Author unknown

Years ago in England there was a postal clerk whose job it was to sort through the mail and separate all of the Christmas letters addressed to Santa Claus. One day he came across an envelope with his own return address, and he recognized his little daughter’s handwriting. He opened it and found the words she had written:

Dear Santa Claus,

We are very sad at our home this year. Little Charlie, my brother, went up to heaven last week and when you come to my house can you get his toys and take them to him? I’ll leave them in the corner by the chimney’“his hobbyhorse, his train, and everything. You see he might miss them in heaven. . . especially his horse. He loved riding that horse so much. So just take them to him and you don’t need to give anything to me. But if you could leave something for my Daddy that will make him stop crying, it would be the best thing you could do for me. I heard him tell Mommy, that only eternity could cure him. Could you give him some of that?

The Reverend Peter Marshall once wrote of Christmas, ‘May we keep it in our hearts, that we may be kept in its hope.’